Sparked by Words

The Soft Edge of Dark

Moments are forced upon us though we forge our own paths.

There are possibilities and false leads in every direction.

The outcome is never an absolute and regret or relief might both result.

The soft edge of dark lures us into the void then leaves us waiting, alone.

This is what chokes our airways, stanches our blood.

 

It’s the response we choose that makes us who we are – hero, fool, supplicant.

Knowing that the future is always a mystery grants us courage or makes us cower.

Success is a triumph one day, an accusation the next, a mourner over the open grave.

It slices our souls. It pools our tears. It makes us human.

This is what sears our minds, opens our hearts to prayer.

 

Just a thought 79

 

Landscape painting by Orson Pratt Huish, courtesy Wikipedia

 

 

 

Comments on: "The Soft Edge of Dark" (38)

  1. ‘Yes’, I nodded, all through this

    Liked by 1 person

  2. especially ‘… lures us into the void then leaves us waiting, alone’, where I nodded ‘oh’ rather than ‘yes’

    Liked by 1 person

  3. More questions than answers, Sharon.
    You’ve given me something to think about. Any relation to the painter?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Sharon,
    It seems to me your ur heart is crying over many things in this poem. Greatly written
    and leaving us to search for answers.
    Those two quotes from your post seems to also carry answers.

    “The soft edge of dark lures us into the void then leaves us waiting, alone.
    This is what chokes our airways, stanches our blood.”

    “Success is a triumph one day, an accusation the next, a mourner over the open grave.”

    miriam

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Jenna Barwin said:

    My heart broke open as I read your beautiful words. Thank you.

    Like

  6. My heart and soul breaks every morning when I wake up and remember what kind of world we live in now… Hero, fool, supplicant – I feel like this with each new hour, round and round in circles.

    Liked by 2 people

    • You’re right, Sarah, it’s an overwhelming and dizzying experience. I’ve read so many uplifting articles from more thoughtful people than myself, but I can’t pull myself from this bottomless terror.

      Liked by 2 people

      • I’m so sorry to hear that, Shari, and wish I could help you to leave that bottomless terror (preferably by a visit and a big hug, cake and tea, art and an endless chat!). I hope you are in contact with your sons and their families via phone or even Skype? Please take good care of you, and try to distract yourself as much as possible, I’ve noticed this helps a bit, at least during the days. Maybe try out some new recipes? Or, if you haven’t already, start that lovely illustrated book your were planning to do for your grandchildren. You can also call me if you feel like talking (I believe I gave you my phone number?) or write me an email. Just ry to get it off your chest, whatever burdens you so much. Sending you an enormous hug, dear friend!

        Like

      • Sarah, it’s for friendships like yours that I haven’t abandoned blogs entirely. You are so incredibly kind. Thank you for caring about me and writing these loving words.
        Yes, I stay in touch with both our sons and their families and it helps. It’s their future and the future of the world that worries me – how long will it take the economy to rebound and how much stress can everything bear? I spent much of my college years campaigning and protesting for justice and equality for everyone, and I’ve seen so much turned the wrong way. Now this health crisis and the appalling mismanagement by our egotistical president and his sycophantic crew endangers people, not just in this country, but everywhere. This is what keeps me worrying – not for myself but for everyone else. And I feel helpless to correct the situation.
        Please take care of yourself, and tell your mom I said hello. Luvya, Shari

        Liked by 1 person

      • You’re most welcome, dear friend! I do feel with you – even if I’m not always happy with what our leaders are doing and declaring, so far they seem to handle the current situation with care and I’m grateful for that. The orange man keeps busy staying in the news with one horrendous deed or say after the other, the WHO thing yesterday… 😦 People like him always concentrate on who’s to blame instead of trying to find a solution, what a careless waste of time and energy.
        Please try not to worry about it all too much as it has a negative effect on the immune system – I know easier said than done. Take care, my friend, and call me whenever you need! Love, Sarah

        Like

      • I may take you up on the phone call one day. Please email me your number AND best time to call you. I’ll figure out the time difference. Luvya, Shari

        Liked by 1 person

      • Will do!

        Like

  7. Wow
    I would be hard-pressed to choose which words, phrases, thoughts, feelings resonate with me the most. An incredible charged & heartbreaking piece.

    Thank you for risking to give voice to the strange place I find myself. Even though we lead a rather different lifestyle than most, yet we are pushed about each day by the ebb & flow of the news cycle.

    Be well and keep safe.

    Like

    • Thank you so much for your kind comments. I find myself teetering between feeling so grateful for all the thousands of people risking their health on behalf of the rest of us, and feeling desolate about what comes next. I hope this finds you and your loved ones healthy and safe.

      Like

      • I hear you, Sharon. I wake up each morning, perky and looking forward to the day. But at the close of each, it is the dread as news unfolds with increasing numbers & restrictions. But at least we spend time in gratefulness & positivity instead of living in fear all the time.

        Hang in there – stay sane & healthy!

        Like

      • “I wake up each morning, perky and looking forward to the day.” Guiding thoughts on a sound compass – thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. My favorite lines:
    It’s the response we choose that makes us who we are – hero, fool, supplicant.

    Knowing that the future is always a mystery grants us courage or makes us cower.

    You have a way with words . . . has anyone ever told you that? . . . .

    I smiled at your response – if you had the answers more people would listen to you. I think if you had the answers more would PAY you (money, if not homage).
    xxxx

    Like

    • IF I had the answers, but then – I’m not the guru at the top of the mountain. Thank you, Judy, for your kind accolade. You always encourage me and make me think maybe something of value trickles from this pen.

      Like

  9. Hi Sharon,

    Your words are moving and the phrases that stood out for me are:

    It’s the response we choose that makes us who we are – hero, fool, supplicant.

    Knowing that the future is always a mystery grants us courage or makes us cower.

    Beautiful, heart-tugging words..I am reconnecting after a very long blogging break and look forward to reading more of your work. It is a strange time for me to return, but then again, the reconnecting and communication are appealing during these uncertain times of shelter-in-place. I hope you are staying safe and well. Lauren 🌼

    Like

    • Hello, Lauren,
      I’ve been hopscotching around your blog, impressed with your sensitivity to the pulses found in nature and appreciation and for your graciousness at the opportunities presented you, even under duress. I haven’t left comments yet, but I’ll return and do so.
      I’m pleased that my words engaged you. I write all the time, but haven’t blogged much in the last year. Though I love so many of the folks I meet here, I’m unsure how to make my blog more appealing. (Right idea? Wrong idea? Too lazy to figure it out? Yeah, this last one.)
      Stay healthy yourself, you and yours.
      Shari
      At any rate, I’ve noticed your (familiar) name in the comments of some of the other bloggers, so thank you for reaching out and making a connection.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks so much for your beautiful words after hopscotching around my site and I look forward to seeing you there when you have time. Do you prefer Shari or Sharon? I like to get names right because of childhood experiences with my own name. Long story. Before I returned, I made some slight changes to my blog and all the pages. Just a little makeover that felt good. I think I heard Baydreamer sigh…So it’s an idea if you’d want to try it out. Just like getting highlights or haircuts for us, but I’m not saying yours needs a do-over. It’s more of a personal choice. πŸ™‚ Anyway, it’s nice to reunite in this blog world. Take care, Lauren πŸ’—

        Like

      • Funny about names, isn’t it? Sharon seemed like a huge name for a tiny kid. I wanted to be called “Tammy,” and had no allegiance to the great-grandmother after whom I was named. My first day of college, after being asked my name by a stranger, I answered, “Shari.” I am still Shari to all my family and friends now, but my legal name is Sharon Lynne Pratt and my writing name is Sharon Bonin-Pratt, Bonin being my maiden name. Our parents tie in all sorts of genealogy, mythology, and dreams to the names they give us but we choose our own. Some cultures assign a baby name, then one the child has grown into, often keeping it a secret to protect their soul and strength, and also give them a name by which they’re publicly identified. And of course we often change our names when we marry.

        I like “Baydreamer,” and Lauren Baydreamer is very pretty. It’s unique, I’d love to learn your story.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks for sharing your “name” story and for your compliment about Baydreamer which was born because I live in the bay area of CA and I’ve always been a dreamer. My author name is Lauren Scott, but Scott isn’t my last name. My last name is German and hard to pronounce correctly, so I couldn’t wait to marry. πŸ™‚ Scott is my middle name which I loathed as a child. My first and last name were uncommon and easily mispronounced, and to top it off, my middle name was a boys! But that annoying middle name became part of my author name, hence, Lauren Scott which you’ll see on my blog. It has a better ring than even my first and last name. So, in the end, it’s all good. There is more to the story regarding my middle name, but I’ll skip that part for now. πŸ™‚ Wishing you all the same, Shari. ❣

        Like

      • What an interesting journey to your new name. Funny how parents saddle us with their dreams that sometimes end up being burdens. Thanks for the explanation.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. perfectly said – one step at a time, one day at a time…

    Like

    • Thank you. The days are getting longer, aren’t they? No end in sight to this plague.

      I remember when the polio vaccine came out and in 1956, my dad, a family doctor, began a massive inoculation campaign. As the Ewing Township School District (Trenton, NJ) physician, he went to every school and vaccinated every kid. My entire family, all my aunts, uncles, cousins, and grandparents, about 80 people, came to our house one afternoon in spring. They lined up in our living room and walked through to my dad’s office where he gave everyone a shot, and then walked around through the back entrance into our kitchen. What a production. It was the first summer that everyone was able to face the heat without the dread of catching polio. Now we are desperate for a vaccine to protect us from Corona virus, but it’s probably still 18 months off.

      Stay safe, Daal.

      Like

  11. All so very true, Sharon. Poignant thoughts for a poignant time.
    I hope you and yours are staying well. πŸ’—πŸ’—

    Like

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