Sparked by Words

And the Blood

 

Until they bleed, writers stand in a circle, before one, behind another, scratching each other’s backs – reading, writing, reviewing. Yours is so well written, exciting, mesmerizing, now read my book.

Once in print, writers turn like a carousel for the public circuit – Facebook, talk shows, conventions, book fairs, trade shows, congregations, schools, radio broadcasts, audiences anywhere – whoever will listen. Arrived in a dream, born of my soul, please read my book.

Writing is a deeply, intensely private affair, conducted in silence in a space illuminated by the flame in our bones, propelled by the curiosity of our minds. Writers crouch over their words, bodies immobile, obsessed with story. Years of hard work, crafting the vision, someday read my book.

Only the fingers move, the fingers, the imagination –

And the blood.

 

 

 

Just a thought 30

 

 

Image of super blue blood moon

 

 

 

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Comments on: "And the Blood" (37)

  1. Fiction writing is intensely private, while non-fiction writing often depends greatly on the input of other sources.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This marketing stuff–I just can’t get myself to do any appearances. It’s hard enough doing them online! The blood moon–just read a story that included this unusual appearance. What a sight!

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’d be more than willing to do public appearances – should I be asked. Please, someone, invite me.

      When my sons graduated on the same day, thankfully different times, from middle (younger) and high (older) school, we drove home from the stadium while entranced by the hugest, most gorgeous, and deepest orange moon I’d ever seen in my life. It was a blood moon, lounging on the horizon like a great tangerine cat, and defying us to look away – which we didn’t. Talk about pomp and circumstance!

      Liked by 2 people

  3. It is an odd occupation/hobby. The loneliness and privacy needed to compose our works, to then subject them to public scrutiny. We writers are an odd bunch.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Scratching each other’s backs, indeed! Mind you, if I were an author, I’d do some back scratching, for sure.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Thinking … there is the gift of a Word Press audience to project our voices worldwide. Sometimes, though not always, knowing it is enough.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Jenna Barwin said:

    Writing is a private occupation, but not necessarily lonely. Not only do I have wonderful writer friends to help me stave off loneliness, but my characters keep me company in my darkest hours. They were born from stress, a way to escape. I find comfort in them even as I release them into the wild.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I like your attitude, Jenna. I am kept company by the characters I create but sometimes I have to get out of the dark corner where the computer sits and be with real people. (I think you know what I mean.)

      Like

  7. perfect! you always come up with the best pix to illustrate complex ideas…

    Like

  8. Striking image and post, Shari! 😀😀 I do enjoy the privacy of writing,the total absorption within words but also enjoy talking,sharing the craft. As in small groups,conversations. I’ve just been invited to talk to students at a school as ‘an inspiring writer’ and am filled with terror!! Way way out of my comfort zone…not convinced about this part of writing. It’s got my blood coursing through my body in sheer panic!

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’re in for a wonderful experience, Annika. I’m assuming these are high school kids. Don’t panic, kids can be very accepting and kind. Imagine they are your nieces and nephews. They want to know about you and how you write. Some of them are beginning writers and they’re interested in your journey. You could tell them about how you started writing when you were a kid, especially the stories that didn’t quite work. They’ll relate to that. Maybe choose one very short piece from your book to read to them. Let them ask questions – they’ll have a million. You’ll be surprised how insightful they are. I hope you love every minute of this experience and maybe you’ll write about it on your blog. Best wishes to you.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Bless you, Sharon! I feel so much better reading your advice here. I love my niece and nephew to bits and when they were younger had so much fun, especially doing creative activities. Good idea about starting with my writing as young…and now to find an excerpt from my book that will interest them. Many thanks and yes, I hadn’t thought about posting about it (still in blind panic) but that is a great idea. Your support and encouragement is such a wonderful help. Hugs xxxx

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hugs back, always.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. “(Lots of times, it’s head scratching.)”
    Other parts of the anatomy come to my mind . . .

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    • Ha – Seriously, it’s often hard to figure out what to do, how to handle all the demands honorably. I was referring to writing reviews for other writers, and the complex industry politics of doing so.

      Like

  10. It’s really odd this juxtaposition of these two activities: writing in private and the publishing process. I imagine most writers enjoy the hopefully overwhelming attention for only so long, being used to hours of lonely writing.

    Like

    • Big league writers – the ones who are interviewed on talk shows – learn to use the system to best advantage. They reap many more book sales out of those public exposures. Writing is an intense activity. I don’t need absolute quiet like some people, but I do need an extended period of time. I “think” writing all the time – in the shower, falling asleep at night, walking around the neighborhood, listening to people talk and catching the cadence of their speech. Sometimes a single word will grant me an aha moment that translates to a sentence or chapter. When I worked as an art teacher, I also had these moments of inspiration that had to become part of my current art project.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I know these moments of inspiration well. Even when I´m not actually painting, I kind of paint in my head, especially on my works in progress – if that makes any sense. 😀

        Like

      • Sarah, it absolutely makes sense. I used to teach art and was a mural artist, so I did the same thing. I still work out composition or color problems in my head for paintings in progress, though I only paint for pleasure now.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. You have a wonderful community of support. Novel writers – I envy.

    Like

  12. The writing is the easy part for most – I think many writers are introverted, enjoying their own company and that of their characters. The hard part is being out there – on the net, on the book selling circuit. That is when the blood is shed.

    Like

    • I don’t know if writing for me is easy as much as it is involuntary for me – I am compelled to write. Even revising and editing don’t discourage me. What does make me tremble is the query process. I’m not a super social person especially in large crowds where I don’t know anyone. Querying feels like standing in the middle of a room full of strangers and convincing them they’re my best friends – all of them. For me, querying takes a quart of my blood and I feel faint.

      But tell me to put the query process aside and start a new book – I’ve done that now 4 times. Yikes!

      Liked by 1 person

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