Sparked by Words

Moth

Captivated by moths. The beat of their wings so soft that the breath of elves do not approach their whispered thrum. I’m alive, I’m alive here.

Bodies thick with fur weighing less than a thimble of honey. The flash of exquisite wing art to terrify predators and frighten humans who approach at night. Leave me, leave me be.

Diurnal creatures attracted to light, intuitively brave explorers. They flit toward all the light in the world, basking in its artificial or natural beams, yet steal none of it, leaving plenty of glow for everyone else. We share, we share always.

To lose myself in your shadow and you in mine, yet each remain whole. More ourselves when paired, more complete than if we flew alone. How can I not be enchanted by greed that is not selfish? Love you, love you too.

Strangers may witness but my heartbeat is yours to claim. Do you see me drawn to your candlelight, my wings beating in the dark? Captivated by you, I’ve claimed all but taken nothing. I am, I am yours.

 

Just a thought 59

 

Painting Emperor Moth, Vincent Van Gogh, courtesy Wikimedia Commons

 

 

 

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Comments on: "Moth" (32)

  1. Lamp. Love the message behind this writing, it is very meaningful and thoughtful. Your blog is lovely too. Hope to see more from you. Have hope, write on! ❤️❤️❤️

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow! Shari, this is beautiful and I will never look at moths the same way again! Your writing is exquisite, with such pure magic as ‘ The beat of their wings so soft that the breath of elves do not approach their whispered thrum.’ From these deceptively simple creatures your drawn deep spiritual analogies with our very being, existence with ourselves and one another.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I am not a moth fan but that picture–exquisite.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. This is delightful to read, Sharon. It makes me look at moths anew. Your descriptions and imagery are enchanting!

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  5. P.S. I don’t recall ever seeing this Van Gogh painting before – thank you for including it! (He’s my favorite artist…)

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    • I’ve had several opportunities to see Van Gogh’s work in various museums and loved every exhibit, but I was also unfamiliar with this painting. He was an extremely prolific artist, especially considering what a short period of time he devoted to his craft.

      Liked by 1 person

      • His life has always fascinated me (since reading “Lust for Life” back when I was 18)…. Have also read a book of his letters that he wrote to his brother, and various other biographies. You can feel the pulse of his passion in his paintings. How wonderful it must have been to actually see his work, as you have!

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      • Your comment about feeling the pulse of his passion is spot on for describing Van Gogh. We saw dozens of his paintings at the Los Angeles County Art Museum decades ago – I moved from one gallery to the next, in awe. And slowly.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Oh, I would love to have had that experience, Sharon – of viewing Van Gogh’s paintings in person. I too would’ve been in awe! I can only imagine the vibes.

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      • It was a wonderful show with a broad range of Van Gogh’s art, and I spent hours at the museum, soaking up painting after painting.

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  6. This was a slam dunk of Just a thought. You have taken something that we don’t always connect with beauty, but you have shined a new light on these creatures.

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  7. what gorgeousness — just when I thought everything that a love letter could be was already worn out…

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  8. Jenna Barwin said:

    Lovely! And the extra eyes on their wings that do not see keep predators away. Fascinating creatures.

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    • I enjoy watching moths and all kinds of creatures but I still shy from touching most of them. Now send a puppy my way and I’m all outstretched palms and goofy dance. Thanks for stopping by, Jenna.

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  9. I love moths, at least I admire the unusual ones. I’ll bet they would blush with delight to hear such eloquent words about themselves. Do you get your inspiration from an image or find one for your words?

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    • No one has ever asked me that question before, Terri. I am always inspired by an event, action, or person. As I write, I usually consider an idea to represent my premise but I search on Google images. Sometimes the perfect image isn’t in public domain and then I have to find something else suitable. Though I’ve seen hundreds of Van Gogh’s paintings (some at museums, others in art books) I’d never seen this one of the Emperor Moth.

      Thank you for the praise for my poem.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Sharon you have excelled yourself. Every stanza holds a truth. I must admit I was disquieted by the last stanza. The truth I took from that I don’t think you intended so I have read and reread and my disquiet has settled but not quite gone. I hope one day you will consider publishing your Just a thoughts. They always give me cause to stop and think and react to.

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    • Thank you for your compliment, Irene, but I’d like to ask what you thought I was trying to say in the last stanza. It was meant to convey giving oneself completely to the one you love, that you trust them to keep your well being in mind. Perhaps it says something I didn’t intend.

      Another friend also suggested that I publish my poetry. It shocked me at first to listen to her suggestion because I have never considered myself a poet. In fact, a college poetry writing class was the first one I nearly failed. It was many years before I even attempted to write a poem. But I’m thinking about it – maybe one day.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m sure that it is only me as no-one else felt what I felt but it felt like giving over to death and welcoming it. Probably the place my head is at at the moment. When we analyzed poetry at school I often wondered what the poet would have thought of the interpretations people came up with. I think we often perhaps go to deep into the meaning and of course we all bring our own perspectives and life experiences with us to everything we read and the author has no control over this.
        I’ll look forward to that day your poetry is published.

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      • The poem has intentionally dark undertones, thus the reference to moths which are night creatures. So now I see why you found it disturbing. It wasn’t intended to be about death, but you’re right: when artists reveal their work, in whatever form, we must release what we create to those who take it for their own. All interpretations are valid as long as they can be supported by what is there in the art, even what is merely suggested. This is what makes art so interesting – what the viewer brings to the table completes the art.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I hadn’t thought of that – the viewer completes the art and each piece is recreated and finished possibly thousands of times over.

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      • I taught art for decades so I think a bit differently than some folks. Art opens the world in new ways.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. I’m a bug lover so this was really special!

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